Trees

We offer a large selection of native trees and shrubs for planting on memorial plots, such as English Oak, Ash, Wild Cherry, Field Maple, Silver Birch, Rowan, Hazel, Guelder Rose, Crab Apple and Holly.

Please feel free to scroll through the slideshow to see what trees are available (please note that not all trees will be available at all the sites):

The tabs for the individual burial grounds on the left show details and price lists of all items at each of our grounds.

Please note that some tree types grow very large so we are limited in how many we can plant in one area. Also some species prefer more light or more shade, so we have to manage our planting accordingly. For this reason we cannot plant every tree on every plot, but we will help you to find the right plot for the tree you want. Trees are usually planted twice a year, from October through March as this is the best season to allow a tree to properly establish its roots before it then begins its main annual growth period in the following spring and summer.  Time must also be set aside for the ground around the grave to settle, a minimum of 6 months is needed from the time of a burial before the tree is planted.

English Oak

English Oak

Latin name Quercus robur

Large deciduous trees, 25–35 m tall (exceptionally to 50 m), with lobed leaves 7–14 cm long. Flowering takes place in mid spring, and their fruit, called acorns, ripen by the following autumn. The acorns are 2–2.5 cm long.

It is a long-lived tree, with a large widespreading crown of rugged branches. While it may naturally live to an of a few centuries, many of the oldest trees are pollarded or coppiced, both pruning techniques that extend the tree's potential lifespan, if not its health. The oldest oak in the UK is believed to be over 1000 years old and is in Lincolnshire.

The Oak is planted for forestry, and produces a long-lasting and durable heartwood, much in demand for interior and furniture work. The wood is characterised by its distinct (often wide) dark and light brown growth rings.

Within its native range Quercus robur is valued for its importance to insects and other wildlife. Numerous insects live on the leaves, buds, and in the acorns. The acorns form a valuable resource small mammals and some birds, notably Eurasian Jays. Jays were overwhelmingly the primary propagators of oaks before humans began planting them commercially, because of their habit of taking acorns from the parent tree and burying it undamaged elsewhere. Mammals, notably squirrels who tend to hoard acorns and other nuts most often leave them to grow when moving or storing them.

Oak forests were once a valuable resource for industrial and naval activities e.g. 6,000 oak trees were used to build HMS Victory.

Ash

Ash

Latin name Fraxinus.

Fraxinus is a genus of usually medium to large trees, and the seeds popularly known as keys or helicopter seeds, are a type of fruit.

The tree's common English name goes back to the Old English æsc, a word also routinely used in Old English documents to refer to spears made of ash wood.

The wood is hard, tough and very strong but elastic, extensively used for making tool handles, quality wooden baseball bats, other uses demanding high strength and resilience.

Wild Cherry

Wild Cherry

Latin name Prunus avium

The wild cherry is native to Europe, northwest Africa, and western Asia, All parts of the plant except for the ripe fruit are slightly toxic, containing cyanogenic glycosides.

It is a deciduous tree growing to 15-32 m tall, with a trunk up to 1.5 m diameter. Young trees tend to have a straight trunk and symmetrical conical crown, becoming rounded to irregular on old trees. The bark is smooth purplish-brown with prominent horizontal grey-brown lenticels on young trees, becoming thick dark blackish-brown and fissured on old trees.

Wild cherries have been an item of human food for several thousands of years. The stones have been found in deposits at bronze age settlements throughout Europe, including in Britain.

The leaves are alternate 7–14 cm long and 4–7 cm broad, with a serrated margin and an acuminate tip. The tip of each serrated edge of the leaves also bear small red glands.

In autumn, the leaves turn orange, pink or red before falling. The flowers are produced in early spring at the same time as the new leaves are pollinated by bees. The fruit is 1–2 cm in diameter, bright red to dark purple when mature in mid summer.

The fruit are readily eaten by numerous birds and mammals, which digest the fruit flesh and disperse the seeds in their droppings. Some rodents, and a few birds (notably the Hawfinch), also crack open the stones to eat the kernel inside.

As the main ancestor of the cultivated sweet cherry, the Wild cherry is one of the two cherry species which supply most of the world's commercial cultivars of edible cherry.

Field Maple

Field Maple

Latin name Acer campestre

Common Field Maple is native to much of Europe. It is a medium-sized deciduous tree reaching 15-25 m tall, with a trunk up to 1 m diameter, with finely fissured, often somewhat corky bark. The shoots are brown, with dark brown winter buds. The leaves are in opposite pairs, 5-16 cm long and 5–10 cm broad. The flowers are produced in spring at the same time as the leaves open and are insect pollinated. The fruit is a samara with two winged seeds aligned at 180º, each seed 8-10 mm wide, flat, with a 2 cm wing. Field Maple is widely grown as an ornamental tree in parks and large gardens. The wood is white, hard and strong, and used for furniture and flooring, though the small size of the tree and its relatively slow growth make it an unimportant wood.

Silver Birch

Silver Birch

Latin name Betula pendula

Silver Birch is a widespread European birch, commonly used as an ornamental in North America. Its range extends into southern Europe it at higher altitudes, the mountains of northern Turkey and the Caucasus, and southwest Asia.

The silver birch is a medium-sized deciduous tree, typically reaching 15-25 m tall (exceptionally up to 39 m), with a slender trunk usually under 40 cm diameter (exceptionally to 1 m diameter), and a crown of arched branches with drooping branchlets. The bark is white, often with black diamond-shaped marks or larger patches, particularly at the base. The shoots are rough with small warts, and hairless, and the leaves 3-7 cm long, triangular with a broad base and pointed tip, and coarsely double-toothed serrated margins.

The flowers are wind-pollinated catkins, produced before the leaves in early spring, the small (1-2 mm) winged seeds ripening in late summer on pendulous, cylindrical catkins 2-4 cm long and 7 mm broad.

The silver birch commonly grows with the mycorrhizal fungus in a mutualistic relationship. The silver birch is often planted as a garden and ornamental tree, grown for its white bark and gracefully drooping shoots.

Rowan Tree

Rowan Tree

The rowans or mountain-ashes are shrubs or trees in genus Sorbus of family Rosaceae. They are native throughout the cool temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with the highest species diversity in the mountains of western China and the Himalaya, where numerous apomictic microspecies occur.[1] The name rowan was originally applied to the species Sorbus aucuparia, and is also used for other species in Sorbus subgenus Sorbus.[2] Rowans are unrelated to the true ash trees, which belong to the genus Fraxinus, family Oleaceae, though their leaves bear superficial similarity.

Hazel

Hazel

The hazel (Corylus) is a genus of deciduous trees and large shrubs native to the temperate Northern Hemisphere. The genus is usually placed in the birch family Betulaceae,[2][3][4][5] though some botanists split the hazels (with the hornbeams and allied genera) into a separate family Corylaceae.[6][7] The fruit of the hazel is the hazelnut.

Guelder Rose

Guelder Rose

Latin name Viburnum opulus

Guelder Rose is a species native to Europe and Asia. The common name 'Guelder Rose' appears to have originated because of a popular cultivar, the Snowball tree.

It is a deciduous shrub growing to 4-5 m tall. The leaves are opposite, three-lobed, 5-10 cm long and broad, with a rounded base and coarsely serrated margins. The leaf buds are green.

It is commonly grown as an ornamental plant for its flowers and berries, and is also cultivated as a component of hedgerows, cover plantings, and as part of other naturalistic plantings in its native regions.

The flowers are white and 4-11 cm diameter at the top of the stems and produced in early summer, and pollinated by insects. The fruit is a globose bright red drupe 7-10 mm diameter, containing a single seed. The seeds are dispersed by birds.

The fruit is edible in small quantities, with a very acidic taste; it can be used to make jelly. It is however very mildly toxic, and may cause vomiting or diarrhoea if eaten in large amounts. Please ensure that Children do not eat them!

Crab Apple

Crab Apple

Latin name Malus

Small deciduous trees or shrubs in the family Rosaceae. They are typically 4–12 m tall at maturity, with a dense, twiggy crown. The leaves are 3–10 cm long, alternate, simple, with a serrated margin. The flowers have five petals, which may be white, pink or red, and flowering occurs in the spring. Apples require cross-pollination by insects typically bees, which freely visit the flowers for both nectar and pollen; all are self-sterile, and self-pollination is impossible, making pollinating insects essential. The honeybee and mason bee are the most effective insect pollinators of apples.

The fruit is not an important crop in most areas, being extremely sour and (in some species) woody, and is rarely eaten raw for this reason. However, crabapples are an excellent source of pectin, and their juice can be made into a ruby-coloured preserve with a full, spicy flavour. A small percentage of crabapples in cider makes a more interesting flavour.

Crab apples are widely grown as ornamental trees, grown for their beautiful flowers or fruit, with numerous cultivars selected for these qualities and resistance to disease.

Holly

Holly

Latin name Ilex aquifolium

Holly berries are mildly toxic and will cause vomiting and/or diarrhea when eaten. However they are extremely important to numerous species of birds, and also are eaten by other wild animals. In the autumn and early winter the berries are hard and apparently unpalatable. After being frozen or frosted times, the berries soften, and become milder in taste. During winter storms birds often take refuge in hollies, which provide shelter, protection from predators (by the spiny leaves), and food.

Many of the hollies are widely used as ornamental plants in gardens and parks. Hollies are often used for hedges the spiny leaves make them difficult to penetrate, and they take well to pruning and shaping. In Heraldry, holly is used to symbolise truth.

In many western cultures, holly is a traditional Christmas decoration, used especially in wreaths. The wood is heavy, hard and whitish; one traditional use is for chess pieces, with holly for the white pieces, and ebony for the black. Other uses include turnery, inlay work and as firewood. Looms in the 1800s used holly for the spinning rod. Because holly is dense and can be sanded very smooth, the rod was less likely than other woods to snag threads being used to make cloth.